Which IP firm in Norway is the most trendy, modern and up-to-date?

click to reach their web site

Maybe you wondered which IP firm in Norway is the most trendy, modern and up-to-date.  Now we know.  It’s Oslo Patentkontor AS.  The way that we know this is that Oslo Patentkontor was the first firm to fulfill a challenge in the sophisticated use of WIPO’s DAS system. 

Diligent readers of this blog will recall the exciting day that the Norwegian Industrial Property Office became a full-fledged member of the WIPO DAS system (see blog article dated January 21, 2020).  In that article I invited practitioners in Norway to prove how trendy, modern and up-to-date they are.  I invited some firm in Norway to be the first to send me a DAS access code for each of the four kinds of Norwegian IP that is to be found in the DAS system.

The winner, clearly the most trendy, modern and up-to-date IP firm in Norway, is Oslo Patentkontor AS.  They provided the four precious DAS access codes to me today.  I was able to obtain a Certificate of Availability for each of the four properties.  Here you can see the four Certificates of Availability (with a few digits blurred). 

click to enlarge

Here is a Certificate of Availability for a PCT application that was filed in RO/NO.

click to enlarge

Here is a Certificate of Availability for a Norwegian patent application.  

click to enlarge

Here is a Certificate of Availability for a Norwegian trademark application.  By the way, this offers a vivid reminder that as of right now there are exactly two Offices that participate in DAS for purposes of trademark applications — Australia and Norway.

click to enlarge

Here is a Certificate of Availability for a Norwegian design application.

By the way, there is something conspicuously wrong about the Certificate of Availability for the PCT application.  The first reader to figure out what’s wrong, posting the answer in a comment below, will win a prize.

4 thoughts on “Which IP firm in Norway is the most trendy, modern and up-to-date?

    • Sharon wins the prize. She noticed that the PCT application number has “2020” in the middle which means it must have been filed in 2020. And yet supposedly the filing date is in 2019.

      It turns out the Norwegian Intellectual Property Office made a mistake when they entered that particular case into DAS. I think they will fix it.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.