Please sign this PCT-related letter to the new Director of the USPTO

(The letter has been signed and has been sent to Director Vidal.  You can see it here.)

Hello Colleagues.  Here is a letter that I plan to send to Director Kathi Vidal.  My goal is to send it on Tuesday, April 26, 2022.  What this means is that I hope you will sign the letter between now and the close of business on Monday, April 25, 2022.   Here are the “asks”:  Continue reading “Please sign this PCT-related letter to the new Director of the USPTO”

How to be unwise when naming your firm

One of the dumbest things that you can do when you are naming your intellectual property firm, it turns out, is picking a name that is more than 35 characters in length.  If you make this mistake, it means you often can’t get paid. 

A related dumb thing is arranging to have a street address that exceeds 35 characters in length.  This, too, might mean that you can’t get paid.

It turns out that there is a simple and quick fix for this problem, as I will mention at the end of this blog article.

Continue reading “How to be unwise when naming your firm”

Now #63 in adult and continuing education

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Amazon maintains sales statistics on every large or small thing that a person could possibly want to know about its book sales.  My newly released book The 2022 Schwegman Advanced PCT Training: the presentation slides has apparently just now reached a ranking of number 63 in Amazon’s category of adult and continuing education.  As you can see in the screen shot at right, this book trails two positions below a study guide for a commercial drivers license test.  

I think that this tells you not so much about a large number of copies of my book being purchased, but instead about the relatively small number of books that people purchase that fall within this category of adult and continuing education.

For context, Amazon says that among books generally, my newly released book has a “best sellers” ranking in position 112,026.  

Time of day at IB returns to normal for US filers

On March 13 I blogged that US filers filing documents at the International Bureau needed to pay extra close attention to what time it is in Switzerland.  The reason is that in the US, Daylight Saving Time happened on March 13.  But it did not happen on that day in Switzerland.  This meant that for the past two weeks, a US-based filer in (for example) the Mountain Time zone would be able to e-file in the IB as late as 5PM and still get a same-day filing date.  This differed from the usual drop-dead time of 4PM.

Today (March 27, 2022) is the day that Daylight Saving Time happens in Switzerland. The consequence of this is that the time difference between the US filer’s time zone and the time at the IB is back to normal.  So for a US-based filer in the Mountain Time zone, the drop-dead time returns today to the usual 4PM.

This change affects for example a US-based filer filing a PCT application at the RO/IB, and it affects the US-based filer filing a design application in the IB’s Hague Agreement e-filing system.  It also affects the US-based filer filing documents at the IB relating to the Madrid Protocol, such as for example a Subsequent Designation.

Most readers of my blog will appreciate that the correct terminology is not “Daylight Savings Time” but “Daylight Saving Time”.

Many readers will also appreciate that EU has been trying for the past two years to get rid of this clock-changing.  There have also been largely feckless efforts in various states of the US to bring an end to this clock-changing. I personally would like it if the place where I am located, and the places where patent and trademark offices are that I care about, would all bring an end to clock-changing.

A very good doorstop, or two PCT training books

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What weighs more than two kilograms (more than 4½ pounds), is more than four centimeters thick (more than an inch and a half), costs about twenty dollars, contains two of every presentation slide from my recent fourteen-hour webinar series of advanced training on the Patent Cooperation Treaty, and can serve as an extremely functional doorstop?  The answer is, of course, two of the books at right, duct-taped together.  Continue reading “A very good doorstop, or two PCT training books”

Now you can binge-watch 14 hours of the Patent Cooperation Treaty

Would you like to attend a free-of-charge two-day advanced course on the Patent Cooperation Treaty?  Here is your opportunity. This series of fifteen lectures on the PCT is available free of charge.  You can watch these lectures from anywhere in the world, at whatever hour of the day or night is convenient for you.  You can watch these lectures on your computer, on your smart phone, or on a tablet.  You could project the lectures onto a big screen in a conference room and watch the lectures as a group activity.

Filing at the International Bureau and Daylight Saving Time

It’s that time of year again.  The time of year when it is important to keep track of the fact that Daylight Saving Time is different in Switzerland from the way it is in the United States.  This is important because you might be in the US, and you might be e-filing some document with the International Bureau of WIPO. For the next two weeks (until March 27), the drop-dead time for e-filing a document at the IB is an hour later than usual.  Usually, to get a same-day filing date at the IB, an American filer would have to complete the e-filing by 4PM Mountain Time (which is midnight in Geneva).  But for the next two weeks, you get an extra hour.  You could complete the e-filing by as late as 5PM Mountain Time and it would still be a same-day filing date.

This might affect you because you are e-filing a PCT patent application at RO/IB.  This might affect you because you are e-filing a Hague Agreement design application at the IB.  This might affect you because you are paying a set of Madrid Protocol renewal fees at the IB.  Or maybe you are filing an Article 19 amendment or a Demand at the IB.

Most readers of my blog will appreciate that the correct terminology is not “Daylight Savings Time” but “Daylight Saving Time”.

Many readers will also appreciate that EU has been trying and trying to bring this to an end.  There have also been largely feckless efforts in various states of the US to bring an end to this clock-changing. I personally would like it if the place where I am located, and the places where patent and trademark offices are that I care about, would all bring an end to clock-changing.

Which Searching Authorities charge the most for bad sequence listings?

(Corrected “ISA/IB” typo to “ISA/IN” thanks to an alert commenter, see below.)

When you file a PCT application that contains a genetic sequence or an amino acid sequence, you are supposed to provide it in a particular computer-readable format.  This makes sense, of course.  For one thing, the various patent offices around the world want to load such sequence listings into searchable databases.  The idea is to facilitate searching so that if later somebody tries to get a patent on some sequence, and if the sequence is not novel, the lack of novelty can be quickly ascertained.  A second reason for this is that if the PCT application tries to claim a sequence, the International Searching Authority can readily carry out a novelty search of that claimed sequence. 

But what happens if the PCT applicant fails to provide the sequence in the computer-readable format?  Or what happens if the PCT applicant purports to provide the sequence in the computer-readable format, but the data file is not formatted correctly?  In such cases, the International Searching Authority is permitted to impose a Late Furnishing Fee.  

Which raises the question — which ISAs charge the most?  Which ISAs charge the least?  Continue reading “Which Searching Authorities charge the most for bad sequence listings?”

Questions and answers that were left over from the first four sessions of the SLW webinar series

Hello readers.  As most of you know, the Schwegman firm and the SLW Institute are hosting a remarkable fifteen-webinar series that make up a comprehensive Patent Cooperation Treaty training program.  The first four sessions have taken place, and there are eleven more sessions to go.  It is not to late to join — click here.  

During the webinars, the attendees type in questions.  I tried to answer some of the questions, but with 750 or more attendees, the number of questions was so great that I was not able to get to all of the questions during the scheduled time.  I have collected the leftover questions from the first four sessions, and have tried to answer as many as I can make sense of, in this blog article.  Happy reading!  Continue reading “Questions and answers that were left over from the first four sessions of the SLW webinar series”